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national guard leave after deployment

As a result: you may have a thin support network at the workplace. Read more about legal planning. As a National Guard or reserve service member, you have three options for leave that you’ve accrued during deployment: payment for leave; pre-separation leave; or a combination of the two. ... You are about to leave the Military OneSource site. If you’re deployed, you still have the right to vote in your home state — either electronically or with an absentee ballot. Military OneSource connects you – or immediate family members – to that needed help. These resources offer a variety of professional support services, and information and referrals to community resources. Find programs and services at your local installation. Yellow Ribbon can help. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this website. Besides practical advice, Yellow Ribbon can help National Guard and reserve service members and their families to sort out: Remember, the military approach to solving problems may not work at your civilian job. Although communication may not be guaranteed, make a plan for how you’ll communicate with each other during deployment. Keep your service member involved and updated on your life. Assistance is provided at your installation to help draft and update legal documents, and it may be free. Although the Department of Defense may or may not use these sites as additional distribution channels for Department of Defense information, it does not exercise editorial control over all of the information that you may find at these locations. The post-deployment paid leave program was established thereafter, awarding additional leave incrementally for Guard soldiers deployed more than 12, 18, and 24 months in a five-year period. To do this, bring copies of your discharge and release documents to the military identification card office at your demobilization station. At work, you’ll face changes. The Pentagon has stripped weeks of post-deployment leave from many National Guard soldiers, leaving units already overseas facing a drastically different … Focus on creating a “new normal” for yourself and together with family and loved ones. Each branch of service offers emergency financial assistance through their respective relief organizations. Visit the Department of Veterans Affairs website for more information on the different programs, eligibility criteria and how to apply. Military ID cards allow family members to access important services and privileges, like TRICARE health insurance and the on-base commissary and exchange. The centers include: Use MilitaryINSTALLATIONS to find contact information. These websites will tell you about: You can get personalized help 365 days a year by telephone and online. Although the Department of Defense may or may not use these sites as additional distribution channels for Department of Defense information, it does not exercise editorial control over all of the information that you may find at these locations. Service members will receive a checklist of tasks from their unit, including a required pre-deployment health assessment. Legally, this might mean that your coverage stops on the date you’re released from military service — including court and administrative procedures, default judgments and evictions. A Wisconsin Army National Guard engineer detachment returned safely to U.S. soil last week after a 10-month mobilization to Kuwait. Regardless of your activation status, there are plenty of programs and services to help you and your family overcome the unique challenges of reintegration as a National Guard or reserve service member. Read through the financial readiness article for more tips on preparing financially. After deployment, you will probably want to take some well-earned leave to spend time with family and loved ones. Talking about what happened during deployment can be hard to navigate. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this website. Here are steps you can take to ease your transition back to work: Bookmark the Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program as one of your favorites. When considering these options, it is important to understand the time frame of eligibility for coverage. Assistance is provided at your installation to help with drafting and updating legal documents, and may be free. Visit the Department of Veterans Affairs website for more information on education benefits. Emergencies happen. These include the Montgomery GI Bill – Selected Reserve, the GI Bill Ticker, the Reserve Educational Assistance Program and the Post-9/11 GI Bill. For immediate assistance or to access confidential help, call the Military OneSource toll free number at 800-342-9647 or international collect at 1-484-530-5908. Remember to talk openly with others, be patient with yourself and those around you, and know when and where to seek help. Be proactive about getting support at home before, during and after your partner’s deployment to ensure a positive experience. More on helpful steps. If anyone will be using your vehicle, talk to them about upcoming maintenance needs and fill out the Vehicle Maintenance Guide for them to reference during deployment. If you’re a National Guard or reserve service member, returning to the civilian work force is part of reintegration. Be prepared for a potential gap in income. Read more about ID cards and connecting with the military community here. Read more about legal planning. This may range from new coworkers and different policies and procedures to new programs and leadership changes. National Guard and reserve commands have organized family support systems of staff and volunteers, such as: ... during and after your partner's deployment to ensure a positive experience. Make sure your pet’s records are up-to-date and provide your pet’s caretaker with veterinary contact information. Make sure all important contact information is up-to-date and that family members are pre-authorized for emergency assistance. You’ll be reentering into family and personal life, as well as work. See the National Guard and Reserve article for more information on these protections. As a National Guard or reserve service member, you can also receive confidential, non-medical counseling and support through Military OneSource regardless of your activation status. Designate a power of attorney — a loved one (or a few) to act on your behalf in legal and financial matters during deployment. Morale, Welfare and Recreation programs through the military can be a great place to start. For more information, see the Safety and Security During Deployment article. Although the Department of Defense may or may not use these sites as additional distribution channels for Department of Defense information, it does not exercise editorial control over all of the information that you may find at these locations. If you have children, check out Five Tips to Support Children During Reintegration. Learn more here. You may feel different about your old job. Look for support outside the military community — neighbors, coworkers, school personnel or leaders in your religious organization about any support services they offer or recommend. The Department of Defense and each branch of the military provides online information for military families, including those in the National Guard and reserves. Revisit your pre-deployment checklists. Civilians generally don’t understand deployment. Spend time taking care of yourself while your service member is deployed. Your spouse or partner is preparing for deployment and transitioning from reserve status to active duty. It can be challenging to continue coping with the effects of deployment while attempting to “live a normal life” on campus. Check in with your personal and legal affairs. Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act. Prepare your home for any maintenance needed during deployment. To learn more, check out the Planning for a Successful Reunion and Reintegration article. Manage the deployment process by knowing as much as you can about your benefits and support resources available. Know what to expect if you’re entering an institution of higher education, especially if you are a National Guard or reserve service member. As you establish a new normal as a family, consider a mix of old and new – it might help to try new routines, pick up new hobbies or establish new traditions with family, friends and loved ones.

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